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The importance of educating your child from the best international schools in Hyderabad

Many parents put a lot of thought and effort into choosing the best international school in Hyderabad for their children. After all, educational institutions often employ different teaching approaches and curriculum that influence each child's lifelong learning. While each educational institution possessing their own set of advantages, the international schools in Hyderabad provide a unique edge to children. Most of the best international schools in Hyderabad impart education starting from playgroup to the 12th grade. Children who attend international schools can gain insight and confidence to deal with other cultures and people in the future. Many students in international schools, reported that studying with peers from different cultures helped them appreciate the world around them in a better way. The international schools in Hyderabad have improved their class of education and are imparting world-class curriculum along with focus on Indian culture and values. Most international schools in Hitech city and the international schools in Gachibowli often incorporate an appreciation for other world cultures into the learning process. These schools often include extracurricular activities within their curriculum. One amongst these international schools near Gachibowli is Open Minds. The students learn to be creative and develop their imagination through such activities. They also follow a unique art curriculum that offers a variety of medium such as the visual arts, theatre, music and other art forms that get students to express their creativity. The school’s extracurricular activities are a great way for children to learn focus and individual development. Children often develop problem solving and critical thinking skills in a good schooling system. Most of these schools also encourage the students to learn more than one language. Students who attend international schools can benefit from all of these distinct advantages. If you are looking out for the best international schools near Hitech city and international schools near Gachibowli, do consider Open Minds.
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3 Paid Social Strategies to Optimize Your Budget From TOMS and Boingo Wireless

In an era of severely limited organic reach, a paid social strategy that optimizes your budget is critical. But how can you best use promoted posts to reach your business goals without breaking the bank? That was the central question tackled by James Chong, senior manager of social customer engagement at TOMS, and Lauren de la Fuente, vice president of marketing and communications at Boingo Wireless, at PR News’ Digital Summit Feb. 24. “ROI on paid social is both feasible and measureable,” said Chong. “Even if you have a small budget, you can gain a lot of insight about your community, and other communities you should be targeting.” Read More >>
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Ghosn cedes Nissan CEO role to focus on alliance with Renault, Mitsubishi

Nissan Motor Co (7201.T) said Carlos Ghosn will step aside as CEO after leading the company for 16 years, allowing him to concentrate on deploying his cost-cutting expertise across its alliance with Renault SA (RENA.PA) and newly added Mitsubishi Motors Corp (7211.T). In handing over the helm to Hiroto Saikawa, a company veteran of 40 years, Ghosn ends years of speculation over when he would relinquish the top job at Japan's No. 2 automaker amid investor concerns that he was stretching himself too thin. Bringing Mitsubishi into the alliance last year has put the group's annual combined sales at 9.3 million vehicles - close in size to industry leaders Toyota Motor Corp (7203.T) and Volkswagen AG (VOWG_p.DE). That has brought new opportunities to benefit from scale but also the challenge of balancing the interests of all three automakers - particularly at a time when progress in plans to integrate Nissan and Renault further has been slow. Ghosn, 62, will continue to be chairman at Nissan, a position he also holds at Renault and Mitsubishi. But he will remain CEO at Renault and heavily involved in the company, an indication of the depth of problems he still sees at the French automaker. "There are still lots of things to be done inside the company in order to make its growth sustainable and lasting and solid," he told Reuters in an interview. While he did not elaborate on the issues he planned to tackle, deeper capital ties with Nissan have been stymied by the French government's lifting of its stake in Renault to around 20 percent with little warning to Ghosn or the board. Tightening emissions regulations have also exposed strains in the Nissan-Renault alliance as plans to integrate their engines and gearboxes have moved much slower than management had hoped for. Read More >>
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Google to help publishers find malicious comments on articles

Alphabet Inc's Google (GOOGL.O) and subsidiary Jigsaw launched on Thursday a new technology to help news organizations and online platforms identify abusive comments on their websites. The technology, called Perspective, will review comments and score them based on how similar they are to comments people said were "toxic" or likely to make them leave a conversation. It has been tested on the New York Times and the companies hope to extend it to other news organizations such as The Guardian and The Economist as well as websites. "News organizations want to encourage engagement and discussion around their content, but find that sorting through millions of comments to find those that are trolling or abusive takes a lot of money, labor, and time. As a result, many sites have shut down comments altogether," Jared Cohen, President of Jigsaw, which is part of Alphabet, wrote in a blog post. "But they tell us that isn’t the solution they want. We think technology can help." Perspective examined hundreds of thousands of comments that had been labeled as offensive by human reviewers to learn how to spot potentially abusive language.
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Dakota pipeline protest camp nearly empty as holdouts face removal

All but a few dozen of the last holdouts from a months-long mass protest against a proposed oil pipeline in North Dakota peacefully vacated their riverside camp as an eviction deadline passed on Wednesday. "We've very firm that the camp is now closed," Governor Doug Burgum, a Republican, told an evening news conference. Following Wednesday's exodus, Burgum estimated there were 25 to 50 protesters left. He said they were still free to leave voluntarily so long as they did not interfere with cleanup crews scheduled to enter the site at 9 a.m. on Thursday. The encampment has stood since August on U.S. Army Corps of Engineers property at the edge of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation near Cannon Ball, North Dakota, about 40 miles south of Bismarck, the state capital. Protesters calling themselves "water protectors" have rallied there against plans to route the Dakota Access Pipeline beneath a lake near the reservation, saying the project poses a threat to water resources and sacred tribal sites. Dubbed the Oceti Sakowin camp, the site became a focal point for U.S. environmental activists and Native Americans expressing indigenous rights, drawing some 5,000 to 10,000 protesters at the height of the movement in early December. Most have drifted since away, as tribal leaders urged people to leave due to harsh winter weather, while pressing their opposition to the pipeline in court. Roughly 300 demonstrators had remained until this week. Read More >>
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AXA steers clear of big deals, manages risks stemming from French politics

AXA (AXAF.PA) has reached a "critical size" and is ruling out major acquisitions such as Italy's Generali (GASI.MI), the French insurer's chief executive Thomas Buberl said on Thursday. It is managing risks relating to May's presidential election in France and raising its profitability through higher prices and cost cutting, after increasing underlying earnings per share by 4 percent in 2016. Although AXA's earnings were helped by tariff hikes in property insurance coverage and a recovery in its life and savings business, Buberl's first set of annual results as CEO were at the lower range of its targets. Concerns that far-right National Front leader Marine Le Pen might win and lead France out of the euro zone - an event dubbed 'Frexit' - have rattled financial markets. [GVD/EUR] [FRX/] "Frexit is a probability, it is clear, we need to look at it. Our job is to manage risks and volatility. A potential Frexit is not the first surprise and not the first crisis that AXA has seen over its history," Buberl said. However, AXA saw the probability of 'Frexit' as not very high, Buberl added, with opinion polls currently showing Le Pen as eventually losing to either centrist Emmanuel Macron or right-wing candidate Francois Fillon in the vote. Shares in the insurer were 0.6 percent lower at 22.68 euros at 1147 GMT. AXA's stock is down around 5 percent in 2017. "We expect AXA's share price performance to remain largely macro driven...with the key drivers remaining concerns on the French elections, U.S. interest rates and European equities," analysts at Barclays said.
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North Korea raps old ally China after China’s ban on coal

North Korea issued a rare reproach of China on Thursday saying its main diplomatic backer was "dancing to the tune" of the United States for halting North Korean coal imports because of its nuclear and missile programs. The North's state-run KCNA news agency did not refer directly to China by name but in an unmistakable censure it accused a "neighboring country" of going along with North Korea's enemies to "bring down its social system". "This country, styling itself a big power, is dancing to the tune of the U.S. while defending its mean behavior with such excuses that it was meant not to have a negative impact on the living of the people in the DPRK but to check its nuclear program," KCNA said in a commentary. China said on Saturday it would ban coal imports from North Korea, which is officially known as the Democratic People's Republic of Korea (DPRK), until the end of the year. The ban came about a week after North Korea tested an intermediate-range ballistic missile in its first direct challenge to the international community since U.S. President Donald Trump took office. Trump's administration has said China should do more to put pressure on North Korea. "A neighboring country, which often claims itself to be a 'friendly neighbor', is .. threatening that 'the DPRK will suffer the biggest loss'," KCNA said in the commentary. "It has unhesitatingly taken inhumane steps such as totally blocking foreign trade related to the improvement of people's living standard under the plea of the U.N. 'resolutions on sanctions' devoid of legal ground." China is North Korea's sole major ally but it disapproves of its nuclear program and has backed U.N. sanctions against it. China calls for the Korean peninsula to be free of nuclear weapons. North Korea has conducted five nuclear tests, including two last year, although its claims to be able to miniaturize a nuclear weapon to be mounted on a missile have never been verified independently. North Korean leader Kim Jong Un said in a New Year speech the North was close to test-launching an intercontinental ballistic missile. State media has said such a launch could come at any time. A fully developed ICBM could threaten the continental United States, which is about 9,000 km (5,500 miles) from North Korea. North Korea was China's fourth biggest supplier of coal last year, with non-lignite imports reaching 22.48 million tonnes, up 14.5 percent compared with 2015. (Reporting by Jack Kim; Editing by Robert Birsel)
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Tech breakthroughs take a backseat in upcoming Apple iPhone launch

When Apple Inc (AAPL.O) launches its much-anticipated 10th anniversary iPhone this fall, it will offer an unwitting lesson in how much the smartphone industry it pioneered has matured. The new iPhone is expected to include new features such as high-resolution displays, wireless charging and 3-D sensors. Rather than representing major breakthroughs, however, most of the innovations have been available in competing phones for several years. Apple's relatively slow adoption of new features both reflects and reinforces the fact smartphone customers are holding onto their phones longer. Timothy Arcuri, an analyst at Cowen & Co, believes upwards of 40 percent of iPhones on the market are more than two years old, a historical high. That is a big reason why investors have driven Apple shares to an all-time high. There is pent-up demand for a new iPhone, even if it does not offer breakthrough technologies. It is not clear whether Apple deliberately held off on packing some of the new features into the current iPhone 7, which has been criticized for a lack of differentiation from its predecessor. Apple declined to comment on the upcoming product. Still, the development and roll-out of the anniversary iPhone suggest Apple’s product strategy is driven less by technological innovation than by consumer upgrade cycles and Apple’s own business and marketing needs. Read More >>
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Steve Jobs-inspired campus to open in April

Apple announced on Wednesday that it will begin moving employees into a 2.9 million-square-foot facility, the plans for which had been presented by the late co-founder Steve Jobs in his last public event in 2011, in April, Bloomberg reported on Thursday. The facility's plans were presented by Jobs during a city council meeting in Cupertino, California, where Apple is headquartered. According to the report, the spaceship-shaped building and tree-filled park will serve as the new campus for the tech giant. Further, the new campus has a new 1,000-seat auditorium which will be named in honour of the co-founder as the Steve Jobs Theatre. The building, the report added, cost Apple $5 billion and faced cost delays. The new 175-acre Apple Park will be open to employees from April, while the construction of buildings and parklands is scheduled to continue through the year, the US tech giant announced. In a press statement on its official website, Apple said that the process of moving more than 12,000 people will take over six months. "Steve's vision for Apple stretched far beyond his time with us. He intended Apple Park to be the home of innovation for generations to come," said Apple CEO Tim Cook. The campus' ring-shaped, 2.8 million-square-foot main building is clad entirely in the world's largest panels of curved glass. "Steve invested so much of his energy creating and supporting vital, creative environments. We have approached the design, engineering and making of our new campus with the same enthusiasm and design principles that characterise our products," said Jonathan Ive, chief design officer, Apple. Apple Park will include a visitors centre with an Apple Store and cafe open to the public, a 100,000-square-foot fitness centre for Apple employees and development facilities and the Steve Jobs Theatre. The Park has been designed in collaboration with "Foster + Partners" and it replaces five million-square-feet of asphalt and concrete with grassy fields and over 9,000 native and drought-resistant trees, and is powered by 100 per cent renewable energy.
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Trump to seek job advice from firms that offshore US work to India, China

President Donald Trump, who has vowed to stop US manufacturing from disappearing overseas, will seek job-creation advice on Thursday from at least five companies that are laying off thousands of workers as they shift production abroad. Caterpillar Inc, United Technologies Corp, Dana Inc, 3M Co and General Electric Co, are offshoring work to Mexico, China, India and other countries, according to a Reuters review of US Labor Department records. Executives from the five companies are among a group of business leaders due to meet with Trump on Thursday to discuss how to help the President deliver on his promise to increase factory employment, according to the White House. About 2,300 US workers at these five companies stand to lose their jobs within the next two years as a result of offshoring, according to the Labor Department's Trade Adjustment Assistance (TAA) Programme, which provides retraining benefits to workers displaced by global trade. Reuters obtained the information through a Freedom of Information Act request. The companies confirmed the planned job cuts to Reuters. It is not clear whether the other 19 executives due to meet with Trump on Thursday are currently offshoring work, as the TAA programme does not cover all workers who lose their jobs due to global trade. The lost jobs amount to a small fraction of the hundreds of thousands of US workers employed by those involved in the meeting. General Electric, for example, employs 125,000 US workers, financial filings show. On the campaign trail and in the White House, Trump has painted globalisation as a zero-sum game that has enriched low-wage countries while leaving the United States littered with abandoned factories and underemployed workers, and he has threatened to tax companies that offshore US jobs. The experience of companies on Trump's task force, however, shows the reality is more complex in a world where they are serving customers across the globe. Several said they were creating many new US factory jobs even as they move work to other countries. It's not clear whether Trump will opt for the carrot or the stick. Trump plans to meet business leaders to hear their reasons for "why they're going offshore", said a White House aide who spoke on condition of anonymity. Blue-collar workers who share Trump's scepticism of global trade say they will be watching closely to see if he will try to save their jobs. "I don't think he's a typical politician, so there is hope alive for middle-class families that he will do something," said Scott Schmidt, one of 222 workers at a GE engine plant in Waukesha, Wisconsin, who are due to lose their jobs later this year when the company shifts production to Canada. General Electric CEO Jeffrey Immelt is among those due to meet with Trump on Thursday. GE says it is closing its Waukesha plant because Congress has hobbled the US Export-Import Bank's ability to finance large export orders while most other industrialised nations still offer such financial support. The company says it laid off 225 workers last year at a Houston factory for the same reason, shifting production to France, the United Kingdom and Hungary. GE says it is also closing an Ohio factory and laying off 180 workers because consumers are buying fewer of the florescent and incandescent light bulbs they make there. What production remains will be handled by a factory in Hungary. Offshoring and onshoring The US economy lost 6 million manufacturing jobs from 2000 to 2010, roughly one-third of its total, in part due to offshoring, but the sector has added 900,000 jobs since then, according to the US Bureau of Labor Statistics. Multinational companies say labour costs now are only one factor they consider when deciding where to manufacture. An auto maker, for example, may decide to build a particular model in the country where sales are strongest, prompting parts suppliers to set up there as well so they can turn around orders quickly. The offshoring picture is also more complex than official statistics indicate as a shuttered factory in the United States does not always mean a new factory abroad. When auto-parts maker Dana Corp closes a factory later this year in Glasgow, Kentucky, that is operating at 20 per cent of capacity, one of its plants in Ohio will pick up the work, along with other factories in Mexico, India and China. Dana CEO James Kamsickas is among those scheduled to meet with Trump on Thursday. The company plans to hire nearly 700 US workers over the next three years as it expands factories in four US states, spokesman Jeff Cole said. That is little comfort to the 223 people in Kentucky who will lose their jobs. "It seems like all these CEOs and companies have turned their backs on the American worker," said Dana employee Tim Wells, one of those who will be laid off. Layoffs still planned The group also includes United Technologies CEO Gregory Hayes, who took heat from Trump last year for planning to move jobs from Indianapolis to Mexico. The company struck a deal with the incoming president in November to preserve roughly 700 jobs in exchange for $7 million in tax breaks. United Technologies says it still plans to lay off 786 workers at a separate Indiana plant and move production to Mexico this year. The company is also moving work from a facility in Arden Hills, Minnesota, resulting in a loss of 72 jobs. Most of that work is staying in the United States but some is moving to Poland, spokeswoman Bethany Sherman said, and some of the affected workers will be offered positions elsewhere. The company is adding more than 1,000 new jobs in the United States, Sherman said. Other participants include Caterpillar Chairman Doug Oberhelman, who oversees a company that is laying off 712 workers in the American South and Midwest and moving the work to China, Mexico, Italy, France and Germany as it weathers the largest sales slump in its history. A Caterpillar spokesman said it is simultaneously creating 1,300 new manufacturing jobs elsewhere in the United States. Also due to participate is Inge Thulin, CEO of 3M, which is eliminating 130 jobs in suburban Cincinnati and moving production to Mexico. The company says it has added more than 2,000 US manufacturing jobs over the last five years.
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